Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘rocks’ Category

As everyone in Atlantic Canada knows, this has been an unusual fall. It was fairly innocuous and pleasant until Post-tropical Storm Noel hit in November, immediately followed by a mix of rain and snow (I wish it had been a bit less post and a bit more tropical). Then winter hit a “little” early, with frequent flurries and temperatures that rarely made it above -5 C. Then we got this week’s weather. Things started warming up until today it broke plus 10 in places, a fair amount of rain fell, then it cleared up this afternoon and was amazingly sunny, with brisk (to a Newfoundlander) winds and temperatures staying above zero.

The nice thing for me was that the storm gave half decent waves along the Atlantic coast, so I rushed to Peggy’s Cove after work. Except for the wind blowing sea spray directly onto my lens when shooting straight at the waves, it was perfect. I finished around 4:40 pm, then drove back to town. Things had become strangely calm, with very little traffic, almost nothing open (except video stores and movie theatres, of course). The sense of calmness and serenity was wonderful.

I went home, downloaded some of the images from the Cove, and present them as one view of an Atlantic Canadian Christmas. Happy and peaceful holidays, and may your New Year’s resolutions be little ones.

Looking Out the Entrance

Looking Out the Entrance
The Gulls were really active, since the waves had stirred up the ocean.

In the Cove

In the Cove
Bad waves almost never make it into the Cove. Today there were 4-5 metre waves outside the cove and pounding on the entrance.

Crash

Crash
Tip: Don’t shoot directly into the wind, unless you like spray on your lens…I wanted this shot so much I tried it anyway.

Broken rock

Boroken rock
The large flat rock near the centre was broken off the ledge in the foreground. I estimate that it weighs on the order of 120 metric tonnes.

Boom

Boom

Smash

Smash
Best Viewed Large. Note the chunk gouged out of the rock in the foreground. This comes from Noel in November. There was a lot of damage in the Cove.

Sunset

Sunset
Along the Coast

Along the Coast
The entrance to the Cove is just beyond the little red shack. This coast is full of rock ledges and often has a lot of wave activity.

 The Evening Light

The Evening Light
I know it is cliche, but the light was very nice.

Again, have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, and Happy Quanza, Hannukah, and Chinese New Year (coming soon). Given the recent weather, I’m just as happy with a warm and dry Christmas.

a quickr pickr post

Read Full Post »

In 1963 something strange happened off the coast of Iceland. Smoke and steam started rising above the waters, followed by rapidly solidifying lava. This grew into the island of Surtsey. It was pretty interesting to scientists to see a new volcanic island rise out of the abyss, and the biologists had a field day. First birds landed on it, dropping twigs and seeds. It was amazing how quickly plants took root, and a small ecology developed within weeks and months of Surtsey rising above the waves.

This summer a yacht near the Tonga Archipelago in the Southwest Pacific found new volcanic island, rising out of the ocean, after sailing though an area of ocean covered with a raft of pumice (a volcanic rock which floats fairly well). They documented it in their Web log and the sighting was also confirmed by a fishing boat. There has been no official confirmation by the Tongan government as yet. The pictures are something special.

Sailing to Vulcan’s Forge

Island in Flames

Wake through the rocky ocean of pumice 

Rocky Sea

There are no reliable sightings of a great city rising from the waves with great and ancient buildings with strange and impossible angles and shapes. There is absolutely no evidence of a gate that should never be opened, and the architecture is definitely NOT “loathsomely redolent of spheres and dimensions apart from ours.” The is absolutely positively no sign saying the R’lyeh Arms.

Ph’nglui mglw’nafh Cthulhu R’lyeh wgah’nagl fhtagn!

Map showing how horrendously far great R’lyeh is from either of these islands

Map of Surtsey

Map of Tonga

Map of Tonga chain

Read Full Post »

A while ago I had an early morning free, and I’ve wanted to take pictures along the coast near dawn. However, that morning a storm was coming in, and the satellite image from Environment Canada showed cloud already almost too far east. I took a chance and raced out to the cove I wanted to shoot.

I lucked out; there was cloud overhead, but there were many holes off to the east. These conditions are often the best for shooting sunrises. To top it off, the wind was almost calm, the rain under the cloud approaching from the west was making a very dim rainbow, and a fishing boat was heading out for the morning chores. The area was almost totally deserted, and the morning light was glorious. The images below don’t do justice to it.

The rest of the day was rain, drizzle, and fog, but the dawn was worth it. I think you’ll recognise the location.

Morning on the Rocks

Red Green Reflection

Dawn Breaking Over the Rocks

Dawn Light and Green Light

Gold Headlands

The View East From Peggy's Cove

A Minor Reflection

Reflections on the Weather
There was a storm approaching, and I thought there was a bare chance of catching the sunrise before it clouded over. I did make it, but within half an hour it was dismal and intermittent showers started.

Tending the Nets
Fishermen from Peggy’s Cove heading around the point to tend a net. They put one person in each of the skiffs around the net to help handle it. They really stood out against the lowering horizon.

Rain Clouds
There were rain clouds approaching from the west. I have seldom seen a rainbow in the morning, partially because it is usually overcast when rain approaches, and partially because I’m either up too late or in the wrong place.

a quickr pickr post

Read Full Post »