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Archive for the ‘Peggy’s Cove’ Category

Here are some random images from the area around Peggy’s Cove taken in the last few weeks. It is pretty similar to home, and I like wandering around. Occasionally there are some half decent waves, as well.

Happy Birthday,  Heather!
I found this on the barrens east of Peggy’s Cove. It was an iron sculpture in the shape of a flame standing exposed on a large erratic. I have no idea who made it, why it was made, or when it was made. It is a solid orange-red with rust.

Frosting on the Cake

Egyptian Tuckamore

On Castors
This Erratic had the most rocks and pepples supporting it.

Peggy's Cove From the East

Shed in Gold

Dawn Light on the Light

The Mirrormere

Jade and Whitewater
Still plunging, but with a nice wall of spray generated. Some of the water is being accelerated at 10-100 times the force of gravity as it is bounced upwards.

href=”http://flickr.com/photos/rexton/sets/72157600018333462/show/”>slideshow.

Jade and Foam
2/3rds through the plunge

href=”http://flickr.com/photos/rexton/sets/72157600018333462/show/”>slideshow.

About to Plunge
This is called a plunging breaker (the ones surfers like). This and the following picture were taken with identical settings.

There were some nice waves breaking on the coast on Sunday. I’ll be putting up some images for the next while; I took more nice ones than I had thought.

Plunging
The front edge is accelerating downwards very fast. The shutter speed was okay for the previous shot, but the edge is moving too fast here. I still liked the effect too throw this out.

There were some nice waves breaking on the coast on Sunday. I’ll be putting up some images for the next while; I took more nice ones than I had thought.

Breakwater
I was driving along the coast and the wall of whitewater rising over the breakwater caught my eye. It was 20-30 feet high, judging by the 15 foot high breakwater.

Prospect's  Sunrise
Looking from Peggy’s Cove towards Prospect. ‘Prospect’s Sunrise’ On Black

Fisheye

Steel Dawn

A Minor Reflection
‘A Minor Reflection’ On Black

Gold Headlands
‘Gold Headlands’ On Black

Tending the Nets
‘Tending the Nets’ On Black
Fishermen from Peggy’s Cove heading around the point to tend a net. They put one person in each of the skiffs around the net to help handle it. They really stood out against the lowering horizon.

Reflections on the Weather
‘Reflections on the Weather’ On Black
There was a storm approaching, and I thought there was a bare chance of catching the sunrise before it clouded over. I did make it, but within half an hour it was dismal and intermittent showers started.

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Normally when shooting pictures at night I don’t go beyond 15 second exposures, since my camera has a wide lens and this works great with any ambient light. Last night I was driven to experiment. I found out that I need a better camera, and that there are situations where you shouldn’t use one.

Yesterday, mumbling monkey sent out a head’s up about the Leonids meteor shower. Last night was the only possible night for good shooting, starting near 12:45 am AST and lasting about 2 hours. I decided to try to catch them, as this year was supposed to be better than average. If conditions turned out too cloudy, I could always take night shots from the area.

I went west of Halifax, since the sky looked clearer there. When I reached Peggy’s Cove it was a bit too cloudy, so I shot pictures of the harbour, the lighthouse, etc. Then about 11:30 pm I looked up. The sky was blazing with stars above and to the northwest, and there was no moon. However, to the east, where the greatest activity was expected, there was too much sky glow from Halifax, and it was still cloudy. There was also some cloud directly to the north.

After 2 seconds of considered thought, I jumped into the car and drove west to Mahone Bay. I planned to check the sky there, and if it was clearer inland I’d scoot north about 20 km to get away from the coastal communities and their Christmas lights (yes, it has started already). Otherwise, I’d try the coast and hope that I could find a dark enough area along the coast. Near Chester, the odds looked pretty favourable inland.

Driving north for about 10 minutes got me to a side-road with a view to the east, and there was almost no light in sight. There was some cloud on the horizon, but I decided to chance it. It was mostly clear , cold but calm, and a car would pass every 5-10 minutes; good enough. I set up my tripod, aimed the camera, and acclimatised to the light.

Then I looked up. I could see the Milky Way, and the stars were so numerous it was hard to pick out the Big Dipper. I was eventually able to pick out Orion’s Belt and orient myself, but in order to find the Big Dipper, I needed a bit of light to reduce the sensitivity of my eyes. Some of the stars seemed in colour, and this was verified later in a photo I took.

For the next while I sat on the car in total silence and looked up and to the east. I was miles from anyone, there were no animal noises, the air was calm and cold, and the endless detail in the moonless sky mesmerised me for over half an hour. I only saw a few streaks from meteors burning up, but the incredibly beautiful welkin and the utter stillness of the world brought me peace.

After starting to shiver so much that the stars blurred (making the Milky Way look more milky) I left and drove home along the empty road and highway. The pictures below don’t do justice to the sky, and I didn’t take many anyway.

Over the Edge
Over the Edge
A rock at Peggy’s Cove. The light on the rock is from the lighthouse, and I tried my first long exposure (the rock looked much darker to me).

O’Ryan

O'Ryan

Great Bear to Polaris
Great Bear to Polaris

Can you pick out Polaris using the Pointers?

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A while ago I had an early morning free, and I’ve wanted to take pictures along the coast near dawn. However, that morning a storm was coming in, and the satellite image from Environment Canada showed cloud already almost too far east. I took a chance and raced out to the cove I wanted to shoot.

I lucked out; there was cloud overhead, but there were many holes off to the east. These conditions are often the best for shooting sunrises. To top it off, the wind was almost calm, the rain under the cloud approaching from the west was making a very dim rainbow, and a fishing boat was heading out for the morning chores. The area was almost totally deserted, and the morning light was glorious. The images below don’t do justice to it.

The rest of the day was rain, drizzle, and fog, but the dawn was worth it. I think you’ll recognise the location.

Morning on the Rocks

Red Green Reflection

Dawn Breaking Over the Rocks

Dawn Light and Green Light

Gold Headlands

The View East From Peggy's Cove

A Minor Reflection

Reflections on the Weather
There was a storm approaching, and I thought there was a bare chance of catching the sunrise before it clouded over. I did make it, but within half an hour it was dismal and intermittent showers started.

Tending the Nets
Fishermen from Peggy’s Cove heading around the point to tend a net. They put one person in each of the skiffs around the net to help handle it. They really stood out against the lowering horizon.

Rain Clouds
There were rain clouds approaching from the west. I have seldom seen a rainbow in the morning, partially because it is usually overcast when rain approaches, and partially because I’m either up too late or in the wrong place.

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When I came to work in Nova Scotia, I kept hearing about Peggy’s Cove. To the uninitiated, it may be the single most popular tourist attraction in Nova Scotia. There are a number of reasons for this. First, it has an almost iconic lighthouse on exposed rocks. Second, there are often spectacular waves breaking on the shore. Third, there is a picture book fishing village with a population of about 40 people. Fourth, it is easily accessible to the tourists in Halifax, especially the tourists off the cruise ships. And last but not least, it is in one of the few areas in Nova Scotia with barrenlands.

The first time I visited the site, it was somewhat of a let-down. My overall impression was of a typical outport in Newfoundland, with slightly different architecture, and with a typical (albeit unusually well-kept) lighthouse. The rocky terrain was nice, but not that unusual for home, and I’ve seen waves as good or better at Cape Spear. Finally, the barrens were very typical of home.

Strangely, I kept coming back, and the area grew on me, almost without my noticing. It is a good place for waves and looking at the ocean, and in the off season there aren’t too many tourists. There are still real fishermen in the village, along with the nick-knack shops. And the rugged coastline has a certain grandeur.

I finally realised that the reason I like it now is the same reason that made it a bit of a let-down to me initially. It reminds me of of home, and makes me appreciate home more and more. In fact, if I stay here much longer I’ll probably end up loving the place!

Here are some pictures from a walk through the barrens and then to the village, from a little while ago. Add some steep hills and a few moose and pitcher plants, and it would be Newfoundland.

Rock on the rocks
The main boulder is completely off the ground. It is sitting on four stones. You can barely see Peggy’s Cove light on the right (west).

Peggys Cove from the East
Looks pretty exposed, doesn’t it?

Turtle Head

Promontory
For some reason I kept thinking of the Transvaal in South Africa

Tree on the rocks

Evening on the barrens
The barrens in the fall have amazing shades of red. It was true in Newfoundland, and it is true in Nova Scotia.

The Eastern Long-legged Photographer
The barrens in the fall have amazing shades of red. It was true in Newfoundland, and it is true in Nova Scotia.

Peggys Cove Nights 2

Duck Flotilla

Peggys Cove Nights 4

Peggys Cove Nights 5

Light Before Dark

Light and Dark

Light After Dark

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